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Firmbee (CC0), Pixabay

There is more competition in the job market today than ever before, so now is a good time to start thinking about how to become more employable at that point, after school.

The good news is that while you’re still in school or university, there are many things you can do to improve your chances of being guaranteed a good job after graduation. It’s a case of just being ahead of the curve. Some students start freelance jobs and help out with other students that way. They write notes, prepare essays, and get paid for their homework help. It’s pretty simple but very rewarding.

You might find some of the options quite amusing, and others might even help you guess exactly what you’d like to work for in the future. There are plenty of things you can do that other applicants won’t so don’t feel bad about the stats, no matter how unpromising they may be. We’ve put together this guide, including lots of ideas on how to be the perfect candidate for a job and how to set the framework for her future search.

Consider what you’d like to do

Start by seriously considering what you’d like to do. It may seem too early to think about how you want to spend the rest of your life, but then every profession uses the groundwork that has been laid.

Work hard and get good grades

It may sound trivial, but if you take on a ton of hard work while in school, it will pay off for you the moment you can show off your impressive accomplishments on your resume. What’s more, you’ll have another advantage: you’ll be able to impress your teachers, who will later give excellent recommendations, and you might even win school awards.

So study well, spend more hours in the library, acquire some other qualification, for example, an advanced level in some other subject. Ask to be given extra homework that will deepen your knowledge of each subject. If you write well, start entering contests with your stories or poetry. All this hard work will certainly help you when applying to university, and will also improve your future employability.

Write your resume as early as possible

Now it’s worth taking a little time to write your resume. This will allow you to summarize exactly what you need to provide employers, so you can then fill in the gaps where future qualifications and work experience need to be listed. Having a resume ready in advance also means that you are always prepared to submit it to potential employers for part-time jobs.

There are plenty of templates available online that will help you if you need them. You can also find some resume templates on the TotalJobs website. Whatever you do, if it can demonstrate useful skills (teamwork or organizational skills, for example), then there is a place for it on your resume.

For example, let it be some kind of team sport you play or let’s say you help a local special needs care facility. Responsible positions such as classroom leader or local bandleader, for example, maybe especially good at demonstrating your abilities.

Put together your resume so that your best accomplishments are immediately apparent; it should not end up being more than two pages long. Don’t forget to include your contact information and proofread before sending it to anyone. Employers usually don’t have enough time when they have to go through all the resumes they send, so make it as simple as possible for them.

Learn an additional foreign language

You probably already learn a foreign language in school in addition to your native language, but you can make even more of an impression if you learn an additional language either by taking classes after school or by learning it yourself. Languages are useful in many areas, especially when it comes to tourism and travel, as well as international companies with offices in more than one country.

Job candidates who speak more than one language have an advantage over those who only speak one, as they are more communicative with clients and potential business partners and can help with translation. Plus, there will be more options open to you when choosing and finding a job. Don’t work yourself to death by adding learning an additional language to your already busy curriculum. You can choose a language akin to the one you already know, thus taking advantage of what you already have.

Get some work experience or do a summer internship

Getting some work experience during your school breaks will make it easier for you to figure out what field you want to pursue a career in, as well as give you some experience that you can put on your resume. This is a good way to spend your summer break productively because instead of aimlessly fumbling around during the long extracurricular weeks, you’ll be working on starting a career path that is valuable to you.

Find a part-time job

Taking a Saturday job is another way to gain experience in the business world, and having one doesn’t have any detrimental effect on your studies. If you can strike the right balance between studying and part-time work, working on Saturdays in sales or customer service, for example, will give you some independence while teaching you important skills.

It may not be anything fancy: even working in a coffee shop will teach you a lot of business-related things, as well as give you a little extra work experience to mention on your resume. On top of that, you’ll also earn some more pocket money, which you can put aside for your future university studies, or spend it just to treat yourself to something nice as a reward for all your hard work.

Whether you’re earning money working as a tour guide at a local tourist attraction, picking fruit on a farm, or teaching younger students, any part-time job will introduce you to working life. Not only will it provide you with a foundation to take your first step up the career ladder after university, but it will also keep the job from seeming daunting by the time you get your first full-time position.